Life is a gift!

Life is a gift.

The greatest gift you have ever been given is your life. Life is good, God made it to be good. Every breath we take and every day we live, is a gift from the creator of the universe. Who desires nothing more than to know us, to love us bless us and use us.

Life is a gift, but many of us are absorbed in our day to day existence and somewhere along the way forget that we have been blessed for a reason. Life is not only ours for the taking, but for the giving.

remi-walle-UOwvwZ9Dy6w-unsplashOur talents, our ideas, our resources, our time and our very hands and feet – God will use them all for His glory if we just give them to Him. We all have something to offer. Rich, poor, young, old, every one of us has something we can offer.

So why do Christians give away so little? What if our perspective changed a little? If we realise, or even remember, that we have been given the greatest gift ever. Life. And the bible tells us we’ve been given an ABUNDANT life.

“The thief does not come except to steal, and to kill, and to destroy. I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly”. John 10v10

Take a look around. What have you got that God hasn’t given you? Every heartbeat, every breath, every good and perfect gift comes from God. He is the ultimate giver. He literally gives us gifts we can’t comprehend. Think about this, there are more electrical impulses generated in one day by a single human brain cell than by all the telephones in the world.

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God gave us our senses, and good tasting food! Food didn’t have to taste good, it could have all tasted like Kale, but God wanted us to have good tasting food we will enjoy as a gift from Him.

Once we remember this then we begin to see everything around us as if it actually belongs to God. And we are free to give back to God, and why wouldn’t we when he has given us the very breath in our lungs?

God has always given to me knowing He would get little in return. He is a father who enjoys giving good gifts to his children. I’ve heard it say that it’s possible to give without loving, but you can never love without giving. And that is God’s example. For God so loved the world that he gave.

Like most people I’m often driven by what I don’t have, when I should be driven to seek the heart of God, because God’s heart is revealed in his generosity. Maybe our hearts are too.

tim-marshall-cAtzHUz7Z8g-unsplash.jpgWhat does your level of generosity say about your heart?

It’s time to change the world through lots of small acts of generosity.

By giving radically to others. By giving sacrificially to others, and even giving cheerfully to others. We can change the world.

Imagine if everyone chose to hold nothing back, to give freely of their time, their money and their talents. If we place everything in God’s hands, then He in turn will bless others, who will bless others, who will bless others. We could change the world by starting a ripple of generosity. We could flood the nations with God’s blessings that just keeps on going and spreading.

 

A Journey of Generosity

Life is a journey that is not meant to be travelled alone. A Journey of Generosity retreat reflects this shared journey. We find a comfortable setting and explore God’s Word, watch stories of other inspirational givers, enjoy meals together, and ask God’s Spirit to show us how to use the money that He’s entrusted to us.

A CONVERSATION WITH NEW FRIENDS
We don’t lecture, we discuss. We don’t fill out spreadsheets or financial plans; we work to discern God’s will. We strive to understand and offer wise support at the right times. We listen a lot as we learn together to think faithfully and biblically.

A SAFE ENVIRONMENT
Most people who want to talk about money are after something: your money. Where can people gather without fear to discuss how money shapes our hearts? Our gatherings happen in a place of trust. We are privately funded by a group of Christian givers. We will never ask you for money. We simply want to share the joy that we find in generosity in the hope that you will taste it too.

The retreat on 13th September has been postponed. Please check back here for details of future ‘Journey of Generosity’ events!

If you are interesting in attending a retreat as an individual, or hosting one for friends or your church, please do get in touch with Katie: katie.wilson@covcofe.org

Making Space To Be With God in Advent

As Advent approaches, it can be easy to get swept up in the frantic search for presents, the battle to get the food shopping done, the endless list of chores before the family visits…

 

Yet at the same time, it’s a season when we’re looking to increase our time with God.  We want to study the Bible, spend time in prayer, meditate on those well-know prophesies of old and just be still in the midst of the crowds and contemplate the meaning of the season.

Advent is a time of waiting, of anticipation.  This season, just as Lent, is a time when we prepare ourselves to embrace the full meaning of Word becoming flesh, arriving as a tiny baby, dying as a Saviour.  Advent draws our eye back to the promises of God and gives us time and space to consider the riches of God’s plans for his people.

Maybe, then, we need to give ourselves a break and seek God in the simplicity of everyday life.  Maybe it’s quality, not quantity, God wants…

Grab the moments of stillness or quiet

Each day, there will be certain moments where you find yourself with a few minutes in which there’s nothing to do.  It could be whilst you’re waiting for the kettle to boil.  It could be putting the TV on mute during the adverts in a TV show.  Perhaps it’s at that moment where the kids/dog/spouse have gone to sleep and you can just pause momentarily.  At this time of year, standing in the queue at the shops, or waiting under a shelter while the rain stops can all be very practical (and regular) opportunities to take a breath and remember the presence of God among his people.

You could:

  • Have one short verse each day.  You can quickly re-read it through the day in the quiet minutes.
  • Have an email/app on your phone with an Advent reading or prayer timed to your lunch or coffee break
  • Use study notes that give you a brief 5-10 min reflection that can be squeezed in before bed/over breakfast/while dinner cooks
  • Choose a certain place in your house/office and start a habit of pausing there each time you pass and recalling something to thank God for this Advent
  • Recite a simple breath prayer at those quiet moments

Find chances to multi-task

“Liturgy of the Ordinary” by Tish Harrison Warren, suggests lots of everyday activities you could use to reflect on God’s presence:

  • Brushing your teeth
  • Making beds
  • Drinking tea
  • Eating a meal

It’s both practical and thought-provoking!

Another simple thing that can be done is to take an ordinary daily task and practice doing it with God.  A classic example is a commute – perhaps listen to worship music, an audio Bible or podcast.  The “Christmas in Ordinary Time” series here http://contemplativeathome.com/page/5/ is a lovely one.

Walking the dog, going for a run, cleaning or doing the gardening are other things that can be done in God’s company.

Diary some extra time in

Think about taking opportunities to spend longer with God, even if it can only be occasional.  Look at your diary for the next few months for a day where there’s less happening –a group you belong to isn’t meeting, your partner/child/ housemate is going to be away, you’ve got an afternoon off work etc.  Book in an appointment with God at that time (give him a code name if needed – he won’t mind!).  Looking for these times can be a great way of setting aside time to go deeper. 

Why not take some time out:

  • Take yourself to a coffee shop and have a festive treat whilst reading a book/Advent study (Paula Gooder’s “The Meaning is in the Waiting” and “Walking Backwards to Christmas” by Stephen Cottrell are both fantastic!)
  • Go for a walk in the park and chat to God about what’s on your mind as you do
  • Book into a retreat centre for an Advent quiet day or prayer meeting
  • Visit a church service or event that you wouldn’t normally attend

Find the thing that makes you tick

  • Gary Thomas has written a great book – Sacred Pathways – which is widely available
  • NCD has produced a survey which can be accessed online: https://3colourworld.org/en/etests
  • David Csinos has researched this area – The Church of Scotland has a really helpful summary of his ideas.  It’s applied to children but makes an awful lot of sense for adults too

Work out when and where you feel most alive with God – your preferred spiritual style.  For some it might be formal worship in church, for others it may be getting outdoors in God’s creation, for others creative arts, quiet contemplation, acts of service, times of prayer/fasting.  This Advent, make an effort to find the things that get your heart racing or touch your spirit, and make time to do it.  If it’s something you enjoy, it won’t feel like a chore and will help you reflect with passion on this season of promise and anticipation.

The Parish Giving Scheme

Coventry diocese is about to launch a local pilot of Parish Giving Scheme, with the plan to launch it fully in Spring 2019.


The Parish Giving Scheme is a modern, free to use resource to help your church members plan their giving and, where appropriate, do so tax efficiently. Tried and tested by more than 30,000 people, the Parish Giving Scheme will support churches in tackling static giving, maximise cash-flow and reduce administration. By utilising the Direct Debit payment system, the Parish Giving Scheme is also the most secure and flexible method of regular giving available. 

Benefits for donors:

·         A simple way to regularly give financial support to your church

·         Being in total control of your giving

·         The option to increase giving annually to protect your gift against inflation

·         The Direct Debit Guarantee Scheme protects your gifts

·         You can give anonymously if so desired

·         Can give monthly, quarterly or annually

Benefits for your Church:

  • Stable and predictable giving making it easier to budget for the year ahead
  • Efficient reclaim of Gift Aid
  • Protection against inflation by church members choosing to increase their gift annually by inflation rate
  • It’s free of charge to the church and donors, as costs have been covered by the Diocese

Benefits for your Church Treasurer:

  • Reduced administration and paperwork
  • Saves time for them and the people who count the money and do the gift aid returns

Over half of Dioceses across the country are already successfully using the scheme, it’s really exciting that it’s now coming to Coventry Diocese. If you’d like to be involved with the pilot get in touch with Katie on Katie.wilson@covcofe.org

It’s Only Words…

“What is in a name?  That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet”

– William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet

One of the most common questions I’ve had since taking up this post has gone along the lines of “Passionate Spirituality?  Isn’t that all about mindfulness and meditation?”  Someone else asked me whether it was “contemplative stuff with candles”.  The most entertaining was a comment I read online, along the lines of “I tried it once.  It wasn’t for me”.

 

The idea that spirituality is something we do as a one-off made me smile (like dyeing our hair purple or running a marathon – bucket list checked!).  However, at the same time the fact that it is clearly so misunderstood that it can be reduced to a “thing you tried once” made me really sad.  Passionate Spirituality should be an integral way of life for the effective, spirit-filled Christian

I think the issue is often with the word “spirituality”.  For some people, it conjures up ideas of Eastern philosophy, zen-like attitudes and yoga.  For others, it directs their thoughts to the resurgence of interest in New Age spiritualities – crystals, Gaia philosophy and inner-goddesses.  Others do see it as a Christian concept, but as a discrete branch within Christianity that takes a narrow view of contemplative prayer or ancient monastic traditions only followed by the holiest of people.

From the start, I want to make it clear that there is absolutely nothing wrong with contemplative prayer, meditation on scripture, lighting candles or any other form of expression that a person’s faith is drawn to.  There is a rich and symbolic history behind all of these things and the opportunities they present to “be still and know” God’s presence are incredibly valuable… 

…but these are still only a tiny selection of the ways in which we can have a passionate spirituality at work in our lives.  So, let’s strip it right back and work out what it’s all about.

Let’s start by using different terminology.  If “spirituality” has connotations for you that are negative, confusing or just plain vague, let’s talk about “discipleship” instead.  The origins for the word are well-known to be focussed on learning from or being a student of someone, but the Latin word for disciple also had close ties to the word “Capulus”, meaning “to grasp” or “take hold of” (commonly used to refer to the handle of a sword).  So discipleship could be seen as grasping learning and understanding about God.  Passionate Discipleship, then, is about being eager and enthusiastic in doing so.

Passionate Discipleship actively seeks opportunities to draw close to God.  Passionate Discipleship seizes time, space and activity in which to grow in knowledge and understanding of the nature of God and the person of his Son, Jesus.  Those first disciples lived their lives in the presence of Jesus.  They travelled with him, ate with him, talked and laughed with him and then grieved with him.  Through the presence of the Holy Spirit, we get to do the same – looking for God’s hand in every aspect of our lives and taking every day (not just Sundays!) as an opportunity to grow in our faith and live it out practically through prayer, worship and our relationship with others.

 

“Spirituality” and “discipleship” merely describe the journey each of us are embarking on to follow the path Jesus has set and become transformed into his likeness through the time we spend learning from him.  Moses was physically transformed by the time he spent in God’s presence.  Paul had his whole outlook on life turned upside down.  Encountering God fully, whatever label we put on it, should be our greatest goal.

So, that’s all clear then…?  Well, not quite…

 

In the second instalment of this blog, we will be exploring the concept of “passion” in relation to our Christian faith and considering how a combination of commitment to following Jesus and conviction to do it whole-heartedly can lead us on our way to being the followers he has called us to be.

 

Until next time…

Refreshing Waters

“Fruit trees of all kinds will grow on both banks of the river.  Their leaves will not wither, nor will their fruit fail. Every month they will bear fruit, because the water from the sanctuary flows to them. Their fruit will serve for food and their leaves for healing.” 

– Ezekiel 47:12

 

What a welcome blessing the rain on Saturday 28th July turned out to be.  Farmers and gardeners rejoiced at the refreshing downpour, the reservoirs were topped up after weeks of hot dry weather and the ducks on the canal in Sydenham relocated to the puddles in the carparks!

Meanwhile, over in Budbrooke, the Serving Christ Team were holding a retreat day for lay leaders from across the Diocese, designed to offer time and space for refreshing and replenishing aside from busy lives and ministries within churches.  The idea had first come about after Jen and I had both been meeting with churches who were blessed with enthusiastic leaders who were giving their time and energy to faithfully serve the churches but who were reaching exhaustion and in need of time and space to just “be” with God themselves.

 

Further conversation led us both to reflect on Ezekiel 47 as a relevant passage, with imagery of a river from the temple and fruit trees growing on the banks to convey the depth and expanse of God’s blessing for us.  Very quickly it was felt that God was calling us to step out and hold an event where people in ministry could be ministered to.  The vision was for a day where they could be supported, invested in and blessed with time to be with God away from their busy lives.

We welcomed 28 people from 21 churches to St Michael’s Centre in Budbrooke, supported by our colleague Gareth and Lay Reader Gemma Took, and were hugely encouraged by the day.  As people arrived, there was a buzz of conversation and it was incredibly special to see people greeting old friends from across the churches and taking the opportunity to begin conversations with new people.  We then began the first session of the day with a time of prayer and sung worship, which led into some teaching on the passage, along with a time for reflection and discussion, before breaking for lunch.  The key themes we wanted to bring out from Ezekiel were focused on the refreshing power of the river in his vision, the depths of God’s blessing and power, if we allow ourselves to go deeper, and the rich fruits that He can grow in a leader who is nourished, filled with the Spirit and empowered to pause, rest and invest in their own discipleship.

 Over the lunch break, we had the opportunity to chat with a number of people from across these churches and hear their stories.  Stories of blessing and new opportunities in churches, stories of personal encounters with God, and stories from countless years of faithful and sacrificial service to their churches and communities.  What a wonderful, spirit-filled group of people we met that day – and how they deserved to rest and enjoy being with God!

 

 

The afternoon session was given over to personal time with God, using a selection of creative prayer stations, quiet spaces for individual prayer or just the beautiful natural surroundings that Budbrooke provides.  The idea was for people to be as active or as still as they liked, and to just allow them to find space with God.  The feedback we have received, both on the day and since then, has drawn out how significant this time was.  

It is such a rare treat for most of us to get off the treadmill of daily life and just be with God – and how special and powerful those times are.  Building in regular time with God is a lifeline to those in ministry and that afternoon became an oasis for those present.  Finishing with another time of worship and a short Eucharist, led by Rev David Brown, we drew the day to a close with words of refreshing, blessing and commission.

 

So, having spent the day thinking about how vital God’s living water is, flowing from his throne out into the temple and then out again into the lives of his people, we prayed that those who joined us would feel refreshed and well-watered… and as we walked out of the church at 3.30pm the heavens, quite literally, opened.

 

If you would be interested in coming on future retreats, or would like support to host one of your own, please get in touch with Lisa (lisa.holt@covcofe.org) or Jen (jen.thornton@covcofe.org) at the Serving Christ Team to discuss – they would be delighted to help you.

12 opportunities to thank your givers

When did you last say thank you to those who give to the ministry and mission of your parish? Saying thank you to your givers isn’t only good practice, it is good manners too! On the rare occasions we do acknowledge those giving to the church, it’s often in the most begrudging way. As soon as the gift has been acknowledged, we tell them off for not using gift aid, or start mailing them for further financial appeals. What kind of message is that sending to our donors? Often it’s read as “we’re acknowledging your donation, but it wasn’t enough.” We need to offer sincere thanks, with no tag line of “please give more.”

Here are 12 ideas of simple ways to show your appreciation to those who are choosing to invest in your church. You don’t need to do them all, but you should aim to thank all your donors at least once a year. Don’t be overwhelmed by this, it doesn’t have to come from the church leader or the treasurer every time. It doesn’t have to be a huge gesture and you don’t have to do it alone. Even the smallest act of gratitude can go a long way, and a team of people to help you do it can make it simple.
Some churches choose to use some of these methods only with their high impact gifts, but I challenge you to treat all your givers the same. It is incredibly important to acknowledge the act of giving more than the size of the gift. This is always true, but especially important when thanking our givers. 

Send an annual giving statement with a letter of gratitude. This is great for helping people see how much they’ve given and as proof for their tax returns. There are letter templates available on https://www.parishresources.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Thankyou-Letters.docx

A handwritten note is one of the most powerful ways you can say thank you to your donorsIt doesn’t have to be a long drawn out note; just a few quick sentences from you or someone on your leadership team will do. A little time and postage are a small price to pay in return for their gift to your church. 

How about getting your kids’ group to write a couple of lines of thanks for the impact they’ve made? The kids could sign around the border.

Put something on social media thanking your supporters. “Thank you to everyone who has donated this year, our food bank has fed 30 people this week because of you.” 

Send thank you emails. An email is an easy way to BCC all your regular donors with a quick update about the impact they’re making and how grateful you are.

Thanking them in person, face to face; visiting all your church volunteers and givers each year can be both a rewarding and humbling experience (and it isn’t only the vicar who can visit other people!). At first people will be shocked, and even suspicious of your motives, but then they realise you just want to thank them.

 

Tell them how their money is used, give some real facts about where the money has been spent. How many candles have been purchased, how many hours staff time have been used, how many bibles have been given out etc. Show donors more than just facts and figures, use pictures and say thank you continually. 

NewSpring church created a fantastic video that briefly breaks down how every dollar given to NewSpring is spent. I know not everyone can create something this polished, but your givers will appreciate the effort made. Putting the information together, sharing it, and letting people know that you’re grateful for their giving helps build trust and confidence. 

Get crafty! Do you have some crafty people in your church? Could you get them baking cookies, making wreaths, knitting scarves, or making cards to give as a small gift to show your givers they are appreciated? People don’t give to get something in return, they give out of faith to God, but everyone loves and appreciates a gift when they don’t expect it. 

Send a postcard! Take a photo of one of your ministries, such as café church, and turn it into a postcard with a quick note on the back thanking them for their part in it. 

The Touchnote mobile app can be used to quickly and easily turn your photos into postcards and post them out via the app without much effort from you. 

Send an anniversary card, email or letter on the 1st, 5th 10th, 15th year they have been donating. Celebrate them as a donor and their commitment to your church. 

Tell stories! These can be done as part of your service, ask people to come up and talk about what a difference the ministry or mission of the church has made to their life and how it couldn’t have been done without donations from the church. Think outside the box! How many children have gone through your parent and toddler group, children’s ministry or uniformed groups? Could you ask a parent to talk about how much the church has meant to them, even though they’ve never been on a Sunday before (this could be done on video, or read by someone else on a Sunday if necessary) 

Hopefully this list has given you some inspiration about how to thank your donors. How many are you going to try and complete?

Many of the tips above require you to hold data for your givers. For information regarding General Data Protection Regulations (2018), and the implications for local churches www.parishresources.org.uk/gdpr/  

Listen Out

       Last week we focused on the importance of being a good listener, in particular with a focus on listening to God. This week we are going to pay attention to the second aspect of “double listening”, which focuses on listening to our culture.

       I think most of us would say that we have a pretty good idea about the culture we live in. This is often true in the spheres of influence we find ourselves in. However, in reality when it comes to having an objective understanding of what’s going on beyond our places of work, social groups, the clubs that we are affiliated with it can often be the case that our perceptions aren’t always accurate.  Before I go further it is important to clarify that I am writing to those based in a local church context who are seeking to understand their culture so they are able to respond to the needs of their community in relevant and helpful ways.

 

 

So how can we gain a better understanding into our culture and and bridge the gap so that we can engage more effectively in ways that bring the kingdom of God to our streets? 

“Pray with a bible in one hand and a newspaper in the other”

Karl Barth

When Barth wrote this the newspaper was the best ways to access current affairs. I’m convinced that if this Barth was around today he would have said, Pray with a bible in one hand and a device in the other. In the 21st century we have never so rich on information. We have access to 24 hour news which keeps us up to date, as and when events unfold, we have social media platforms giving us information and in real time. As well as this we have access to a comprehensive range of data all at the click on a button. All we have to do is ask google! For example: I can find out the, the social deprivation, the ratio of single parents, the divorce rate, age profiles of the populace, life expectancy, crime levels, employment percentages, the ethnic diversity, standards of education and other socio-economic information.

For a church that takes the Great Commission seriously knowing that we have the ability to harvest so much information, with relatively little effort is exciting!  When we take the time assess the data available we gain invaluable insight toward the needs in our community. Such information can help to guide us in deciding the form of outreach which will add greatest value to our community (I will post a few website addresses at the bottom of this blog to help you understand more about your unique cultural context). But this should not be the only information that we refer to.

Jesus Asked

When I read about the ministry of Jesus I am shocked to read that the all-knowing Son of God was documented asking a staggering 307 questions during his short time on earth. Jesus was interested about understanding the people he was sent to save, he wanted to know their needs (Mark 10:51), understand what they thought and most importantly he wanted to engage in dialogue.

When we do outreach and evangelism we often set out solely on our assumptions (what we think people need and want, or simply assuming the thing that helped us in the past is bound to be thing that will help them), whilst neglecting to take the time to ask people: how can we practically help you?

This could simply be going out onto the streets and asking people “what three things would they like to see happening in their community?” It could be more focused such as “if they church could help you practically, how…”

Ask the Right People

A great way of learning about the cultural contexts and need of your community is to identify those in key positions of influence. By doing this the church is able to build a positive relationship with those outside the church, gain a better insight into what is going on in the different sectors of society and be able to identify opportunities for the church to help and encourage through prayer and in practical ways.

Below are a few examples of key people that you might want to engage with:

·         Your local MP

·         Local Councillors

·         Head teachers

·         School Governors

·         Youth group leaders

·         Local Care homes

·         Police Community Support officers

·         Leaders of local organizations (W.I. Scouts, Guides)

·         Social workers

       Once we have identified these people we are in the position to make contact, ask them key questions, listen to their experiences and most importantly we can build relationships with them. By doing this bridges are built between our churches and the community in which we live, we learn about what going on from those with the expertise and we gain a better insight into their needs and we gain opportunities to help and practically display God’s love in action.

John Stott concludes in ‘The Contemporary Christian’ that bad listeners make bad disciples.’ By taking the time and effort to listen to God through prayer and meditating on His word we give ourselves the best chance of hearing from Him and thus staying faithful to our tradition so we don’t buy into the temptation to compromise or capitulate in order to become relevant to those outside church. 

 

When we listen to God and listen to culture we gain the ability to engage in a ways are that are authentic not only to our faith but that are relevant to the world we live in. We can therefore respond practically in ways that meet their needs and truly show the love of Jesus.

“Bad listeners make bad disciples”

John Stott, The Contemporary Christian

Holistic PCCs

“We don’t have any small groups”

“We don’t have any small groups” I have been told several times since I started my role. There is often a recognition of their importance and a desire to have them combined with the reality of a tired and over-stretched congregation. This comment is usually shared with me during a PCC meeting. I respond by pointing out that they themselves are a small group.

The recognition that your PCC is a small group can help the members realise the responsibility they have for one another and deepen relationships with openness, honesty and support.

“You are a small group”

There are three main elements to a small group: faith, fellowship and outreach. A holistic small group is working towards the deepening of faith, the support of one another and a desire to reach others. A PCC is unlikely to have time for a full Bible study, social time, extended prayer and engaging with outreach and also complete the important business that it is called to discuss. So how can a PCC develop a more holistic approach, while still being an efficient body?

Here are just a few ideas to help you get started:

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 Faith:

  • Take it in turns to bring a Bible passage (personal choice or decided before). The person leading shares the passage and what they feel God has been saying to them from it.
  • Designate time at the beginning and/or end to pray specifically for the conversations you’ve had and God’s hand in any decisions.
  • Have a few minutes for individuals to share how God has answered prayers or acted in the past week.

These kind of changes can help the group to recognise that God is at work in their lives and the life of the church. It encourages them to notice God in their daily lives. 

Fellowship:

  • Start 15-30 minutes earlier for tea, cake and conversation.
  • Have a PCC social evening at Christmas/New Year and before the summer, without an agenda.
  • Each meeting a different member is asked to share something of their faith and life journey for 2 minutes.

Social times but also times committed to sharing, actively encourage people to learn more about each other in their spiritual, physical and emotional journeys. It encourages the group to invest in each other beyond making decisions.

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Outreach:

  • Keep it on the agenda; what is happening in your church? If there isn’t anything currently happening, what is next?
  • Pray for your community beyond the church walls when you gather together. You could pray for different groups of people or pray and mark off different streets as you go.
  • As a PCC send out letters of gratitude to individuals engaged in outreach. They may be people running or helping outreach linked to the church or they may be doing it in other areas.

Prayers and thanksgiving keep outreach in the forefront of people’s minds and remind members that church exists to support Christians and to reach out to those who don’t know Jesus yet.