The Apple Festival

This week we decided to go to an ‘Apple Festival’. I have not been to such a festival before and neither am I a connoisseur of apples. But, we decided it was a little different and there were lots of things going on, so why not. I know I’ll pick up braeburns if I’m in the shop, but that’s as far as it goes.

 

It was definitely a good choice, there was honey and fudge to try, music playing outside, outdoor games for children, people whittling, animals to view and a miniature train ride. And, to top it off it was sunny and warm, despite the wind blowing our hair.

 

The main attraction was a barn with hundreds of apples on display. Then a whole wall with apples you could try and buy. We decided to make the most of it and joined the queue, bought our empty bag and started working down the row reading about the different varieties and aiming to try every apple slice we could. It was clear the people behind us actually knew about apples, they discussed the russet and the flesh and knew the names of the ones coming up. 

I did not expect part way down to announce that I could taste the promised ‘buttery’ taste and was not a fan or to be surprised at the slight pineappley taste of one whose name began with ‘ananas’. My favourite was clear at the end, the Odin. However, unfortunately this is not available in normal shops and I may need to find an orchard to try one again.

odin apple

The leftover braeburn I ate on the the next day paled in comparison and although I am still no connoisseur, I left far more knowledgeable about apples and my desire to eat them.

 

So how does this link with small group? A good question!

 

Driving home I wondered how I had gone because it looked fun, but returned clutching a bag of carefully selected favourites and understanding that russet apples are apples with a rough patch of green/brown and their skin among other things. I found myself drawing parallels between the characteristics of the day with those our small groups should have:

 

  • The draw may not be to learn more, but for the fun, the community and the food, which is openly and willingly shared. And means, you cannot help but absorb the enthusiasm for the core reason people have gathered.
  • You can come as an ‘outsider’ and find yourself surrounded by people with far more knowledge and understanding. Those people do not withhold the knowledge and look down on your lack of knowledge, but seek to hear your questions and share their knowledge. This means you cannot help but leave with more than you came with.
  • You can come without any real investment but can leave with a passion and desire to know more and be more involved.

What would you need to do to reflect these characteristics more within your group?

A small group that reflects these characteristics, becomes a safe space for people to be drawn into a community where they are loved, where they can explore and they can grow closer to God.

Anna Naish
Learning Mentor for Loving Relationships and Holistic Small Groups.